childhood vaccinations

Childhood vaccinations

Childhood vaccinations protect your child against a range of childhood illness. Vaccines produce specific antibodies in the blood which protect a child against the actual disease in the event they come in contact with it.

There are minor side effects as a result of these vaccinations which include fever and pain at the site of injection, but the risks from contracting the diseases we are trying to prevent are far greater than the risks of any of these minor side effects.

The current childhood vaccine schedule provided in General Practice is as follows:

At 2 months

    • 6 in 1 Vaccine (Diphtheria Tetanus Whooping Cough (Pertussis) Hib (Haemophilus influenzae  b) Polio (Inactivated poliomyelitis) Hepatitis B)
    • PCV (Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine)
    • MenB Vaccine (Meningococcal B Vaccine)
    • Rotavirus oral vaccine

At 4 months

    • 6 in 1 Vaccine (Diphtheria Tetanus Whooping Cough (Pertussis) Hib (Haemophilus influenzae typeb) Polio (Inactivated poliomyelitis) Hepatitis B)
    • MenB Vaccine (Meningococcal B Vaccine)
    • Rotavirus oral vaccine

At 6 months

    • 6 in 1 Vaccine (Diphtheria Tetanus Whooping Cough (Pertussis) Hib (Haemophilus influenzae b) Polio (Inactivated poliomyelitis) Hepatitis B)
    • PCV (Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine)
    • MenC Vaccine (Meningococcal C Vaccine)

At 12 months

    • MMR (Measles Mumps Rubella)
    • MenB Vaccine (Meningococcal B Vaccine)

At 13 months

    • Hib/MenC (Haemophilus influenzae  b and Meningococcal C combined vaccine)
    • PCV (Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine)
 
Childhood vaccination with the flu vaccine is available annually to children and young adults aged 2 to 17 and is administered via the nasal route.

Other vaccines may be ordered privately on request e.g. varicella vaccine (Chicken pox vaccine).

More information may be found on the following website:

Childhood Immunisations